Wildlife

From trout to humming birds, the American Dipper to deer, Seven Falls is surrounded by wildlife. Whether you stumble across are rare find or simply soak in the presence of our full-time residents, your whole family is sure to enjoy observing these animals conduct their daily business in their natural habitat.

Seven Falls Trout

Rainbow Trout

Rainbow Trout

Seven Falls is home to both Brook Trout and Rainbow Trout. The former are only found in cold, high elevation streams like South Cheyenne Creek. In the fall, Brook Trout spawn in the cold waters up stream. They return in the spring, swimming over the falls to take up residence in our pools! Look for the hardy “Brookies” with white marks on the edges of their fins.

Brook Trout

Brook Trout

Rainbow Trout have been a Colorado angler’s favorite since the 1880′s, when they were introduced here from the West Coast. Annually, the Division of Wildlife stocks over 4 million Rainbow Trout throughout Colorado. The Rainbow has a rosy stripe down each side and black spots on its light body.

The American Dipper

American Dipper

American Dipper

One of the worlds most unusual songbird lives and nests right here along the creek. The American Dipper (Water Ouzel) swims underwater by using its strong wings and even walks underwater on the bottom of the stream bed! The Dipper dives in order to feast on underwater insects and to feed their fast-growing young.

How can this songbird swim underwater? The Dipper can submerge itself thanks to an over-sized preen gland that creates waterproof feathers and a flap that closes its nostrils. Look for the amazing Dipper as it dips up and down while perching on a rock along South Cheyenne Creek.

Hummingbirds of Seven Falls

Black-Chinned Hummingbird

Black-Chinned Hummingbird

A flash of color and the whir of wings are often our first clues of these tiny visitors who migrate North each year to take advantage of our nectar rich flowers and flowing streams. Although there are over 300 known species of hummingbirds, we primarily play host to: the Black-chinned, Calliope, Rufous, and – our most common – the Broad-tailed.

Another Black-Chinned Hummingbird

Another Black-Chinned Hummingbird

Our male hummingbirds display iridescent plumage on their throats and have wing tips that create a trill to announce their presence. The females, on the other hand are camouflaged to protect their nests. Some lucky visitors will catch a peek at one of our many Broad-tailed nests while it houses 2 white eggs about the size of coffee beans.

Broad-Taild Hummingbird

Broad-Taild Hummingbird

Keep an eye out around red and orange flowers because these are often rich in nectar. And if your thirst for hummingbirds still isn’t quenched, head a mile north to the Starsmore Discovery Center (about 1 mile north) for even more exposure to these masters of flight.

Kids Love Seven Falls Family Fun